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10-16-2013-UCLA open lecture session_Denise

UCLA’s Oppenheim Lecture Series

Presenter: Allan Jones MBE, I.Eng, FIET; FRSA, Chief Development Officer, Energy and Climate Change, City of Sydney

 

The city of Sidney created a plan to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 70% until  2030 and their plans are to be 100% independent in energy and water.

 

A key component of Sustainable Sydney 2030 is the call for a Green Infrastructure Plan which comprises:

  • Decentralized Energy – Trigeneration Master Plan (cooling, heating and power network in the City)
  • Decentralized Energy – Renewable Energy Master Plan (renewable energy sources: solar panels, wind and/or waste)
  • Advanced Waste Treatment Master Plan
  • Decentralized Water Master Plan
  • When a city create scale (master plans) makes the difference
  • Environmental upgrade agreement is a program that helps the residents to get their money back from investing in green technologies.
  • Waste to energy – food waste, wood, agriculture waste (livestock) = renewable gas
  • Natural gas more expensive than renewable gas
  • Building technologies (solar photo voltaic mainly)
  • Precinct scale technologies
  • Natural gas transportation is 20% cheaper than energy
  • To show the residents and business how much greenhouse gases their building generates the City of Sydney created a graphic. The graphic below shows the projection in 2030 without decentralize energy network and showing with a trigeneration.

(source: http://cdn.sydney2030.com.au/documents/DRAFT-FINA-TRIGENERATION-MASTER-PLAN1.pdf)

 

Links:

http://www.sydney2030.com.au/development-in-2030/city-wide-projects/powering-sydney-allan-jones

http://www.sydney2030.com.au/development-in-2030/city-wide-projects/green-infrastructure

http://www.barangaroo.com/

Curiosity:

Power generation. Renewable energy provides 19% of electricity generation worldwide.

Renewable power generators are spread across many countries, and wind power alone already provides a significant share of electricity in some areas: for example, 14% in the U.S. state of Iowa, 40% in the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein, and 49% in Denmark. Some countries get most of their power from renewables, including Iceland (100%), Norway (98%), Brazil (86%), Austria (62%), New Zealand (65%), and Sweden (54%). (source: Wikipedia)

Event Recap By: Denise Braun, Associate